Article by Benjamin Gordon

My journey to become a successful businessman and CEO has been full of hardships and victories. As I’ve moved up in the ranks, I’ve gained useful experience and I’ve learned hard lessons that have helped me succeed in the long run. Here are 7 things I wish someone had told me before I became a CEO.

  1. Every experience is valuable. Even when you’re experiencing difficulties, you can learn something from them that will benefit you. All successful people know that failure is not defeat. It is simply a chance to learn something new.
  2. Be willing to listen and learn. I’ve learned a lot by listening to my employees share their knowledge and opinions. A culture of open communication allows people to benefit from each other’s knowledge.
  3. Don’t chase too many goals at once. Once you’ve tasted success, it can be tempting to start too many new projects. All of your projects will suffer if you’ve spread yourself too thin to be effective..
  4. Hard work is unavoidable. During my early years at 3Plex, my girlfriend rarely saw me because I spent all of my mornings, afternoons, and evenings in the office. Though we had dozens of employees, I knew I had to step up and go the extra mile to achieve my vision for the company.
  5. Keep a positive attitude. During difficult times, my employees look to me for inspiration and courage. Strong leadership is focused, decisive guidance with a positive, reassuring attitude.
  6. Expect a win every time. If you start a project expecting it to fail, it will. If you’re not confident in a project’s success, then don’t invest your time and resources in it.
  7. Focus on the best ideas. Weak ideas will hinder you from fulfilling your potential. Invest your time and money in the strongest and most effective concepts.

About The Author:
Benjamin Gordon is Managing Partner for BG Strategic Advisors (BGSA), a leading investment banking firm in the supply chain sector.  BGSA specializes in helping supply chain CEOs to maximize their companies’ value via mergers, acquisitions, capital-raising, merchant banking, and other strategic initiatives. Benjamin is also Managing Partner for Cambridge Capital, a merchant bank investing in the supply chain arena.